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20130615
20130623
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
-- pumping billions and billions of dollars into the economy. is it possible that we have gone from a tech bubble to a housing bubble to a fed bubble? >> it's absolutely a risk. the real question is is this easing? all this billions and billions of dollars, trillions of dollars really of dollars the federal reserve has printed and pumped into the economy. have they created a real enduring economic expansion? can housing exist? can housing keep recovering even without ultra-cheap money? can the housing market keep rising without ultra-cheap money? can housing growth continue? that's the bet that ben bernanke has been making the past couple of years. the question is is the debt going to pay off, or will we be right back in this mess we were five years ago? >> isn't the case when former chairman allen greenspan greens retired, he was pummeled because of the housing bubble. isn't it the case, since greenspan left, we've become more liberal with our monetary supply as far as pumping more money into the monetary supply. money has been basically free for investors and businesses for the past seve
economies in terms of -- because they need europe to be able to take their stuff. watch for china -- i don't know who's really running that country, but i can tell you this, their deceleration in economics is just incredible. it's not bringing us down. >> china may go down below 7%, 6% growth this err year. we are right now the tallest building in elmira, new york. >> it's the shung kamao bank. >> how do you know about elmira, new york? >> i come to play. >> you do come to play. we may be the tallest building in elmira, new york, but people keep buying the dollar. what are you going to do? go to europe? go to china? they're all train wrecks wait to go happen. >> you can't feed china. that's a big issue. 700,000 recespiratory deaths la year. let's go to john meacham. speaking of smoking, he smokes way too much. john, you look at europe, the g-8, they were all lecturing president obama three years ago. sarkozy, where is he now? who knows? he's probably staying at your place in the south of france. >> oh, no, unh-unh. >> but united states is in this strange position of just sort of crawling a
and 2011. their take went from 10% to 20% of the whole. we live in a superstar economy. >> e.j., we live in a superstar economy. you base your column in a speech that was actually given by alan krueger at the rock and roll hall of fame in cleveland. talking about the dangers of growing in come inequality. we hear it from the left and the right. alan greenspan says it's one of the greatest threats to american capitalism. what do we do about it? >> there's a number of things we can do about it. i thought the speech was very powerful because how do you get people to talk about inequality. putting it into the context of rock, the theme really is, it's a long way to the top if you want to rock and roll. the difference between the top and the bottom is bigger. i think we're taking some steps already on taxation. i think we need to do a lot more to help people at the bottom end of the economy stay in school longer, go to community college. i think that's part of it. but we also need just a fair bargain between labor and capital. justin wolfer, the economist, put out some charts yesterday that s
changes to make there, but the really big news on the economy came yesterday. obviously, with ben bernanke. >> joining me is former treasury official and analyst steve rattner. also, we have new york times reporter jeremy peters. good to have you both onboard. we'll start with ben bernanke. he expressed confidence in the nation's economic growth yesterday saying the fed will start to rein in its stimulus program later this year. bernanke laid out the federal reserves plan, which includes tapering off its multibillion bond-buying program until the unemployment rate drops to 7%. the fed expects that to happy the middle of next year. >> that's great news, right? >> in some way. >> so that's the good news. what bad news could there be from that, steve rattner. >> i think we'll find out. >> the fed will also hold off on raising interest rates keeping them to near zero until unemployment falls to 6.5%. as for wall street's response, this may be where things change. the markets took a dive as soon as bernanke started speaking. by 3:05 the dow fell 140 points closing the day down more than 200, st
by the french and germans? >> on the economy it's pretty good. but there's a whole other part of discomfort, if you will, with some european leaders and it more has to do -- their reaction to president obama is just like any other politician's reaction to a politician that may not be as popular as they once were. president obama, the nsa things do not play well over here. there has been a frustration by some on the left in europe that president obama hasn't addressed the issue of climate change more aggressively. that's always been a much more important issue to europeans than it ever has been in the united states. and you sort of take all of that into account and so there certainly is -- you know, the shine has worn off. two years ago when president obama would come over here, you know, you know, figuratively throwing rose pe petals at his feet. he still has a huge audience a few hours ago in belfast for a speech he gave that was addressing northern ireland youth. he's going to get a huge number of people at the brandenburg gate when he makes that speech on the 50th anniversary of jfk spee
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)